Orange juice and almonds breakfast cake

Cake for breakfast sounds good no matter how you look at it. I remember my mom making cakes for my brother and I since we were little – and that, my friends, was the best part of waking up and getting ready for school. These cakes were low in sugar, but packed with big flavors. The other day, while I was taking a mental picture of my pantry, I suddenly realized that tea and cereals (I am somewhat lactose intolerant) for breakfast every day is just. plain. boring.

So, I ravaged through the kitchen and concocted a breakfast cake that I was sure would be a step up from my usual breakfast. It was an experiment and I am proud to say, it was a well thought out and executed experiment. But I will let you be the judge. Let me know what you think!

Here is what you need:

2 cups of flour
1 teaspoon baking soda or baking powder (I use a vanilla-based baking powder I buy when I am in Italy)
1/2 teaspoon of salt
1 cup of orange juice (freshly squeezed is best)
1/3 cup of sugar
1 egg
1/3 cup of vegetable oil
1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
1/2 tablespoon of grated nutmeg
1 cup of roughly chopped almonds

The first step is to mix together the dry ingredients. In a medium-sized bowl or food mixer, combine the flour, baking soda or baking powder, salt and sugar. Mix well.

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Pre-heat the oven at 400F. Add the orange juice, egg and vegetable oil and mix together. While the mixture is mixing, add the almonds, nutmeg and vanilla extract. Mix again until the dough is uniform. This cake is purposely not too sweet: I wanted to taste the distinct flavor of the almonds and nutmeg.

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Pour the dough into a cake pan. To add even more texture, I sprinkled chopped almonds on top.
Bake the cake in a 400F oven for about 20 minutes or until golden brown.

Once ready, moved the cake to a cooling rack and let cool for about 10 minutes.
The best thing about cakes for breakfast is that they last three or four days in a cool, dry place.

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This delicious experiment is best enjoyed with hot tea, milk or why not, a glass of orange juice. I hope you enjoy it and I’d love to hear from you! Buona colazione! – Happy breakfast!

The Weekend List 04/12/13

All day Thursday, I thought and lived as if it were Friday. Disappointment ensued when I finally figure it out. It has been THAT kind of week. I am looking forward to the next few days, chock-full of events and exciting beginnings.

First and foremost, the Charlottesville City Market celebrated the opening of its 40th season last Saturday! I happen to be on the board of Market Central, a non-profit organization that supports the market, its vendors and customers, and the farmers market is a big deal for us. Personally, perusing the stalls at the farmers market makes me giddy like a school girl: fresh produce, accessible food. It is really an educational tool for society.

1) In keeping with the social aspect of food and its production,  In When Eating is an Economic Act, interviewed Frederick Kaufman who has a new book out called Bet the Farm: How Food Stopped Being Food an important look into the politics of our food system. Give it a read.

2) There is something about celebrities and cookbooks that I find amusing. I can’t decide whether I am annoyed or revolted, but either way, it’s got to stop. Yet,  this take on Gwyneth Paltrow’s new cookbook is one of the best pieces of writing I’ve read in a while. Hilarious does not do it justice. It’s so much more. had me at “hello.” She gets it.

This is my favorite excerpt:

While waiting for my pre-breakfast Best Green Juice to finish draining — “Just about as energizing as a cup of coffee,” Gwyneth has promised — I begin the recipe for my actual breakfast: Millet Fig Muffins. I dutifully measure out my gluten-free flour, my raw millet, my unsweetened almond milk. I grind flax seed, pinch fine sea salt, toss chopped figs in a spoonful of the dry ingredients, line my muffin tins with paper liners. It’s only noon, and I’m almost done cooking my first meal of the day.

Time to settle down with my green juice, which has acquired a bright emerald color and tastes like a cross between a lemon and a lawn, and wait for the timer to buzz.

Meanwhile, we have 20 to 25 minutes to ponder the meaning of Gwyneth Paltrow.


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I like Paltrow as an actress, and I even like the fact that she has taken the lead on the über local, fresh, no dairy, super healthy. But I can shake off the feeling that they, these celebrities, are all in for themselves. I know, I am naive.
Look at this list of celebrities with cookbooks:
Trisha Yearwood, Valerie Bertinelli, Stanley Tucci (ok, he is beyond awesome), Eva Longoria, Sheryl Crow, Gloria Estefan, Victoria Gotti (!!!!) and my favorite, Teresa Guidice from the Real Housewives franchise – wait…she has 3 cookbooks????? I rest my case.

3) Speaking of celebrities, Antony Bourdain sat down with Andrew Zimmern for a friendly chat on the eve of Bourdain’s new CNN show, Parts Unknown. The thing with Bourdain is that you either love him or hate him. No way in between. I love, love, love his bombastic, foul-mouthed persona. And he is a terrific writer.

In this piece, they talk about the writing process, mainly, Bourdain’s Kitchen Confidential, being called a gonzo journalist, to which Bourdain replies, “I’m an essayist”, and his hosting duties on that weird (very bad) show called The Taste – and the best part, both Zimmern and Bourdain recall reading children’s books to their offsprings and shed a few tears.

A classic: Pasta Carbonara

I often think about my favorite pasta dish. There is so much to choose from, but I have concluded that carbonara is it. I’d much rather eat a steaming plate of carbonara than any piece of meat or slice of cake. First, it has bacon or pancetta. Second, Parmesan Cheese. That alone could be my daily food intake. This dish encapsulates everything I love about Italian cuisine: simple and accessible ingredients. Nothing superfluous.

But I am a lucky girl. Francesco makes a sensational Carbonara. I don’t know what magic ingredient he adds (actually following a recipe???), but he nails it every time. I don’t talk about him often enough, but he is a great cook. He is an engineer, thus  I love watching him cut vegetables, or in this case bacon, with painstakingly precision. It does take him 20 minutes to cut a carrot, but hey, the result is uniform and fabulous.

Here is what you need: (for 4 people)

1 cups of pancetta (or bacon)
500 grams of pasta, Spaghetti or Bucatini
1 egg
1 cup of Parmeigiano Reggiano cheese
a hint of nutmeg
Salt and Pepper

Pancetta, or bacon, is the first ingredient that gets cooking. Cut, or mince – depending on taste, the pancetta and cook it for about 5 or 6 minutes, or until brown. Set aside.
Tip: Don’t oil the pan and don’t add any oil. The pancetta is fatty enough and will release its own juices.

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Next, heat water for pasta in  a medium-sized pot and bring it to a boil. In the meantime – there is never actual waiting time in the kitchen if you time everything right – we can get started on the creamy sauce.
In a small bowl, combine one egg, Parmigiano Reggiano, salt and pepper and whisk until the sun comes down.
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Whisk until the cheese is amalgamated with the egg – it should almost look like a paste; a creamy, cheesy paste. Set the mixture aside.

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Once the water boils, add salt and the spaghetti (angel hair pasta) or the bucatini (as seen below – I much prefer the bucatini for this recipe because each “strand” of pasta is thick and much more chewy than regular angel hair) and cook it until i is al dente – usually 7 to 8 minutes.

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Always taste the pasta before draining –  it may need more seasoning. It is also always a good idea to taste the water before adding the pasta. Salty water will make the pasta much more flavorful.

Drain the pasta using a colander and place it back into the pot. Add the pancetta and pour the cheesy egg mixture in the pot. The cheese will melt and the pasta will be coated with a layer of goodness. Serve while it’s hot.

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Add more Parmigiano Reggiano or pepper to taste. This dish is so simple, but so incredibly delicious, I have to stop myself for making it every week. Buon Appetito!

Focaccia Pugliese (potatoes and rosemary)

I’ve never been able to bake a decent focaccia – either hard as rock or chewy and off-textured. Imagine my skepticism when I decided to give a new recipe a try. Baking has to be my number one passion, I think. I mean, when I think about food, my first thought or memory is bread or cake. Coincidence? I don’t think so. If I could, I would bake sweets and savory treats all day long, hence my unrelenting drive to find baking/bread/cake/pies cookbooks with traditional and unexpected recipes. I’ll say that I would try anything at least once.

While browsing the aisles and shelves of our local bookstore, I found a little book, tucked away in a corner: 100 Great Breads by Paul Hollywood. What I found was a plethora of really simple bread and focaccia recipes that sounded and looked doable. I bought it immediately.

After a few hours of contemplating, I settled for a focaccia with potatoes and rosemary.

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The Puglia region is the hill of the Italian boot. Lots of good food and friendly folks. When I was young, my family used to drive to Gallipoli and camp there for a month. We had an RV and traveled around the coast and stopped at random camping locations throughout the area. I have really great memories of that time and I hoped that by baking something from that sunny land, I would feel the same Joie de vivre. I succeeded. I made this focaccia at least a dozen times since; I served it to my colleagues during a work dinner, to my friends at brunch and my parents at our Thanksgiving dinner.

Here is what you need (my adaptation to the original recipe):

4 Cups of flour
1 Package of yeast
1 1/2 Cups of warm water
3 Potatoes, cleaned and sliced
1 Tablespoon of salt
3 Tablespoons of rosemary
Rock salt to taste
Pepper to taste
Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Combine flour, salt, water and yeast in a bowl and let the mixture form a chewy and elastic dough. Let the dough rest in an oiled bowl for one hour, or until it has at least doubled in size. I like to coat the bowl with a thin layer of olive oil to avoid the dough to stick – trust me, it has happened. Not pretty. I usually place the bowl close to a source of heat – that way, the dough rises a little faster.

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While the dough rises, clean, peel and cut the potatoes. I like to use yellow gold potatoes, bu you can try using any other you prefer. Prepare a baking sheet with parchment paper for the dough.

Once the dough is nice and plump, roll it out onto the said backing sheet and flatten it. Tip: to help flatten it more evenly, I use a round tall glass as a rolling pin and shape the dough to the contour of the sheet.

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Now comes the fun part. With a pastry brush, coat the entire surface of the flattened dough with extra virgin olive oil. Add the potatoes by placing them in whatever arrangement see you fit. Be creative.

Once you are done, add pepper; sprinkle rock salt and rosemary. Let the decorated focaccia dough rest for one hour. In the meantime, pre-heat the oven at 450F.
Tip: I like to cover the dough with plastic wrap, so that nothing will disturb it (cats included).

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Once the dough has risen, place it in the oven and bake it at 450F for at least 30 minutes or until the sides are dark and the potatoes are thoroughly cooked. I like to add a bit of extra virgin olive oil to the finished product.

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Ta daaaa! The focaccia is ready to be cut and served. Francesco and I like to eat it with dinner or as a snack. Put the leftovers in the fridge. Enjoy!